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Thread: Would a rear sway bar help me?

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    Would a rear sway bar help me?

    After 4 years my car is still relatively stock with the only modifications being Swift Spec-R springs and super-pro RCK, pads, and motule 600. I have a TON of other power mods stockpiled in my basement, but I wanted to get a feel for the car before I just started throwing a bunch of stuff on it with no real goal.

    Last month I was FINALLY able to do my first HPDE at Autobahn South and had an AMAZING time. I had an AMAZING instructor and quickly began to improve lap after lap, session after session. By the end of the day he had helped me get to a point where I was getting point by's from a C7 vette and c63 AMG. This solidified what many people have been saying, but as a newbie you kind of brush off....you don't need 500hp-600hp to be fast on a track, but I definitely want a little more power so that the power doesn't fall off above 6k.

    The Evo even in stock for was an animal on the track (at least for me..lol), however there seemed to be a decent amount of understeer when I went into turn 9 on the map below.


    autobahnsouthmap.jpg

    I was able to get 2 ride alongs with the advanced group in a stock Porsche Cayman GTS, and it really gave me a comparison of balance and handling on the track...that car on track is absolutely ridiculous!
    Where I was fighting to get the back end to follow around on turn 9, the Cayman GTS just effortlessly pushed its way through without putting up much of a fight. I get that that car is mid-engined, but I figured there has to be a way to help get the rear end of the evo to follow my input a bit better in those kinds of scenarios.

    I believe a rear sway bar is the ticket, but I'd like some seasoned advice. Which brand would you recommend and why? Any input is greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by JeremyR; 10-13-2017 at 08:59 AM.

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    Senior Member Mnemuth's Avatar
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    I still run the stock sway bar in the front and a whiteline in the rear.

    As I recall, the stock suspension roll was pronounced. I suspect the springs you have are better, but might not be all that stiff. If you lowered the car, that would help but also changes the geometry of the suspension.

    Tires, of course, matter always. Did you monitor tire pressures? I see quite a difference in handling due to tire pressures between front and rear. What tires do you run?

    A rear sway bar is a reasonable place to start.

    I think I was on Autobahn only once, despite living in Chicago. If you want to see where power matters, take the car to Road America (not far from Chicago).
    The finger cannot point at itself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mnemuth View Post
    I still run the stock sway bar in the front and a whiteline in the rear.

    As I recall, the stock suspension roll was pronounced. I suspect the springs you have are better, but might not be all that stiff. If you lowered the car, that would help but also changes the geometry of the suspension.

    Tires, of course, matter always. Did you monitor tire pressures? I see quite a difference in handling due to tire pressures between front and rear. What tires do you run?

    A rear sway bar is a reasonable place to start.

    I think I was on Autobahn only once, despite living in Chicago. If you want to see where power matters, take the car to Road America (not far from Chicago).

    My goal next year is to run BlackHawk farms, the full autobahn course, and Road America (which my instructor was telling me has a crazy back straight on it).


    I thought about monitoring tire pressure, but unfortunately I didn't. I usually run them around 37-38psi cold, so I'm sure once things started to heat up it jumped like crazy. I'll definitely make a point to log and check that as well.

    My Tires are fairly new ( less than 4K miles ) Continental ExtremeContact DW Sports. The RCK is supposed to help with the geometry offset, but with my driving level right now I don't know how much it really matters. I'm also not knowledgeable enough about alignment specs either, so I'm sure there's a bunch that I'm leaving on the table that I just don't know about.


    Do you run your rear on the stiffest setting or are you using a middle setting?

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    Senior Member razorlab's Avatar
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    Tire pressures way too high. Thatís basically what you want them to be hot. They are probably 45+ once you get them hot which would make them feel like ice skates

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    Quote Originally Posted by razorlab View Post
    Tire pressures way too high. That’s basically what you want them to be hot. They are probably 45+ once you get them hot which would make them feel like ice skates
    Now that I think about it they did seem a little less settled on my last session, so that makes sense. What do you recommend as a good baseline and what should my target pressure being once the tires are warmed up?

    I'm clearly starting to see the advantage of the RCP, so I need to pick that up sooner rather than later so I can look back and see what adjustments can be made.

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    Senior Member razorlab's Avatar
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    Depends on tire and alignment but I usually shoot for 38-39 hot. My NT01's seem to have a very small window right around there, anything over and they get a bit squirmy.

    I usually start a session with about 28psi in them.

    If you go by the arrow on the sidewall right by the end of the tread, if the tire wear isn't *just* touching that arrow, then you can run lower pressures. That is one small factor in overall tire tuning but it's a good start.

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